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Our Doctors in the Press


 

As seen on WebMD Psoriasis
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
Please see the below link for viewing:
 

 
As seen on WebMD Mohs Surgery
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
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As seen on WebMD Photodynamic Therapy
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
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As seen on WebMD Athlete’s Foot

Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
Please see the below link for viewing:
http://www.medicinenet.com/athletes_foot/article.htm 
 
 

 
As seen on WebMD Rosacea
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
Please see the below link for viewing:
http://www.medicinenet.com/rosacea/article.htm
 

As seen on WebMD SkinTags
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai

Please see the below link for viewing:
http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/article.htm


 
As seen on eMedicine Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Article
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
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As seen on eMedicine Keratosis Pilaris
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
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As seen on eMedicine Nitrous Oxide
Medical Author: Dr. Nili Alai
 
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BN MAGAZINE: Lifestyles
 

WHAT? You Have That Rash, Too?
by Maria Huynh, BN Magazine

You have probably seen it all the time—either on your own skin or someone else’s. You probably do not even know that it’s unusual. For those who have it, it is an annoying reminder of the less than perfect nature of their complexion.

What is Keratosis Pilaris?
Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is an inherited, but benign, skin disorder that causes small, hard bumps in the skin. It is the result of build-up of a natural protein called keratin in the skin, which accumulates in the hair follicles in a process known as hyperkeratinization. The keratinized skin encloses the hair follicle and prevents the hair from sprouting. The ingrown hair can be removed, but doing so, may cause scarring.
You can recognize KP almost immediately—the individual has skin that is similar to goose flesh or chicken skin. This condition generally occurs or worsens during puberty. According to a recently article published by Dr. Nili Alai of the University of California, Irvine, KP is a very common condition. KP has been found in 50 to 80 percent in adolescents and approximately 40 percent in adults, both in the United States and internationally. More cases of KP are found in women than men.

Health implications of KP
Sufferers of KP have no long-term health implications. There are only cosmetic, aesthetic consequences of KP, as the bumps are rarely sore or itchy. KP often occurs in otherwise healthy people. KP generally gets worse in winter months when the skin tends be drier.

How can I get rid of KP?
There is no cure for KP. Most treatments only marginally succeed in improving the appearance of the affected skin areas. Rich moisturizers and lotions may help very mild cases of KP. For more serious cases, chemical exfoliation methods may be more helpful, such as Lac-hydrin, Retin A or another tretinoin cream, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids, salicylic acid, or urea. Alternatives to prescription drugs can be found in milk baths, which contain lactic acid, an active ingredient in Lac-hydrin. Exposing affected areas to sunlight may work for some individuals. There is no universally effective treatment.

Learn to love your skin
Keratosis Pilaris usually goes away with age. Some individuals have it throughout their lives, often going through periods of time where the condition worsens or improves. KP usually resolves itself without treatment. If you are concerned about the appearance of your skin, it’s best to visit your dermatologist to explore your options for self-

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